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  • Data Types:
    • Dataset
  • Dataset and materials for the rTMS study "Keeping order in the brains: the supramarginal gyrus and serial order in short-term memory". In the "Experiment folders" there are the E-Prime script of the tasks and the stimuli used. In the "Database and all anlysis" folder, there is the anonymus excel database of all 4 experiments and the Statistica workbook with all the analyses conducted and reported in the paper.
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Image
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Audio
  • Operational Momentum in Preschool Children and Adults: Ordering along the mental number line
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
  • SPSS Dataset and R script file
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Dataset
  • Pearson correlation coefficients between kinematic gait variables and SRS subscale scores within ASD group
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
  • Supplemental material, SupplementaryA_PostHoc_novelcomps_ for Trying to make it work: Compositional effects in the processing of compound “nonwords” by Fritz Günther and Marco Marelli in Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • Speakers of languages with synchronically productive compounding systems, such as English, are likely to encounter new compounds on a daily basis. These can only be useful for communication if speakers are able to rapidly compose their meanings. However, while compositional meanings can be obtained for some novel compounds such as bridgemill, this is far harder for others such as radiosauce; accordingly, processing speed should be affected by the ease of such a compositional process. To rigorously test this hypothesis, we employed a fully implemented computational model based on distributional semantics to quantitatively measure the degree of semantic compositionality of novel compounds. In two large-scale studies, we collected timed sensibility judgements and lexical decisions for hundreds of morphologically structured nonwords in English. Response times were predicted by the constituents’ semantic contribution to the compositional process, with slower rejections for more compositional nonwords. We found no indication of a difference in these compositional effects between the tasks, suggesting that speakers automatically engage in a compositional process whenever they encounter morphologically structured stimuli, even when it is not required by the task at hand. Such compositional effects in the processing of novel compounds have important implications for studies that employ such stimuli as filler material or “nonwords,” as response times for these items can differ greatly depending on their compositionality.
    Data Types:
    • Collection
  • Supplemental material, Supplementary_Materials for Basking in detected vice: Outgroup immorality enhances self-view by Simona Sacchi, Marco Brambilla and Verena Graupmann in Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • Supplemental material, QJE-STD-18-370.R2-Supplementary_Material for How difficult is it for adolescents to maintain attention? The differential effects of video games and sports by Marco Alessandro Petilli, Luca Rinaldi, Daniela Carmen Trisolini, Luisa Girelli, Luca Piero Vecchio and Roberta Daini in Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • In the last decade, a growing body of research has revealed that morality is the most important driver of impression formation. As such, social targets lacking morality are disliked and kept at distance, while moral targets are liked and respected. Here, we investigated whether social targets lacking morality elicit positive reactions in the observer. Study 1 revealed that participants reported an enhanced self-view when confronted with an immoral (vs. moral) behavior performed by a political opponent. Study 2 revealed the key role of morality in this process, as differential perceptions of the target’s incompetence had no comparable effect on the observer self-view. Importantly, such results emerged when participants were highly identified with their ingroup. Taken together, these findings suggest that outgroup immorality can elicit positive self-related responses in the observer. Results are discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical implications for social judgment and intergroup relations.
    Data Types:
    • Collection
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