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  • Data Types:
    • Dataset
  • Dataset and materials for the rTMS study "Keeping order in the brains: the supramarginal gyrus and serial order in short-term memory". In the "Experiment folders" there are the E-Prime script of the tasks and the stimuli used. In the "Database and all anlysis" folder, there is the anonymus excel database of all 4 experiments and the Statistica workbook with all the analyses conducted and reported in the paper.
    Data Types:
    • Other
    • Image
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
    • Audio
  • Operational Momentum in Preschool Children and Adults: Ordering along the mental number line
    Data Types:
    • Tabular Data
    • Dataset
  • SPSS Dataset and R script file
    Data Types:
    • Software/Code
    • Dataset
  • This systematic review presents the current state of research investigating the implicit self–concept of personality. First, we present results on meta–analyses estimating internal consistency, reliability coefficients, the implicit–explicit consistency and the single association predictive effect of implicit self–concept of personality measures. To do this, studies were aggregated over personality domains. Second, for each of the Five Factor personality domains, different aspects of construct validity and predictive validity are reviewed in a narrative way. Results show that implicit self–concept of personality measures are reliable, and there is evidence for the construct and predictive validity of these implicit measures, especially in the extraversion and agreeableness domains of personality. However, it must be kept in mind that clear evidence for publication bias was found for studies examining the single association predictive pattern. Finally, this systematic review identifies some achievable improvements that are needed in future research. Large cross–lab efforts are important in this respect. Moreover, the implicit self–concept of personality field must move from an ‘ad hoc’ to a ‘validation’ approach in developing new indirect measurement tasks. By adopting these research objectives, the information processing account of personality will increase its potential to become integrated into mainstream personality theory and research. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Personality Psychology
    Data Types:
    • Collection
  • Supporting info item, per2092-sup-0002-Data_supplement_Appendix 2_figures for Using Indirect Measurement Tasks to Assess the Self–Concept of Personality: A Systematic Review and Meta–Analyses by De Cuyper K., De Houwer J., Vansteelandt K., Perugini M., Pieters G., Claes L. and Hermans D. in European Journal of Personality
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • Supporting info item, per2092-sup-0001-Data_supplement_Appendix 1 for Using Indirect Measurement Tasks to Assess the Self–Concept of Personality: A Systematic Review and Meta–Analyses by De Cuyper K., De Houwer J., Vansteelandt K., Perugini M., Pieters G., Claes L. and Hermans D. in European Journal of Personality
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
  • Pearson correlation coefficients between kinematic gait variables and SRS subscale scores within ASD group
    Data Types:
    • Dataset
  • Supplemental material, SupplementaryA_PostHoc_novelcomps_ for Trying to make it work: Compositional effects in the processing of compound “nonwords” by Fritz Günther and Marco Marelli in Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
    Data Types:
    • Document
  • Humans show a tendency to represent pitch in a spatial format. A classical finding supporting this spatial representation is the Spatial–Musical Association of Response Codes (SMARC) effect, reflecting faster responses to low tones when pressing a left/bottom-side key and to high tones when pressing a right/top-side key. Despite available evidence suggesting that the horizontal and vertical SMARC effect may be differently modulated by instrumental expertise and musical timbre, no study has so far directly explored this hypothesis in a unified framework. Here, we investigated this possibility by comparing the performance of professional pianists, professional clarinettists and non-musicians in an implicit timbre judgement task, in both horizontal and vertical response settings. Results showed that instrumental expertise significantly modulates the SMARC effect: whereas in the vertical plane a comparable SMARC effect was observed in all groups, in the horizontal plane the SMARC effect was significantly modulated by the specific instrumental expertise, with pianists showing a stronger pitch–space association compared to clarinettists and non-musicians. Moreover, the influence of pitch along the horizontal dimension was stronger in those pianists who started the instrumental training at a younger age. Results also showed an influence of musical timbre in driving the horizontal, but not the vertical, SMARC effect, with only piano notes inducing a pitch–space association. Taken together, these findings suggest that sensorimotor experience due to instrumental training and musical timbre affect the mental representation of pitch on the horizontal space, whereas the one on the vertical space would be mainly independent from musical practice.
    Data Types:
    • Collection
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